29Jan/130

Robert Blagojevich dodged going to prison

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Hugo Floriani,  Investigative Reporter

Jesse Jackson Jr. was not the only one saved when John Chase called the Blagojevich camp and warned them that the feds were listening.

Remember, it was Robert Blagojevich that would have been caught on surveillance tapes, meeting with Jackson's money man, Raguveer Nayak.  Chase not only saved Jesse Jackson, Jr. from prison, he also saved Robert Blagojevich.

Hold that thought. We'll come back to it later.

November 21, 2012: Within hours of Jesse Jr's resignation from Congress, Robert Blagojevich expressed his disappointment.  He felt he likely would never be able to clear his own name.

Why is that? you ask.

Well, R. Blagojevich assumed there'd be no ethics committee investigation of Jesse Jackson Jr's attempt to buy the U.S. Senate seat his brother, then Governor Rod  Blagojevich, was selling.

Robert was right.  The DC pols didn't want to investigate that attempted transaction.

However, there's nothing to stop Robert Blagojevich from making his case to the public.

That is, if Robert truly believes his name could be cleared.

Robert Blagojevich has all the FBI wiretap tapes that brother Rod and his attorneys have.

Robert has listened to all the government's wiretaps, and, as of today, he hasn't expressed any disagreement with Chase and Coen's assertion that the contents of the tapes show his brother is guilty.

Furthermore, Robert, Rod, and their respective attorneys have remained silent, while Chicago Tribune reporters Chase and Coen assert that the Blagojevich defense was built on a house of lies.

Remember, the entire Blagojevich entourage was screaming that "the tapes would set them free," if only everyone could hear them.

In their book "Golden," Chase and Coen claim they listened to all the wiretap tapes, and that there is nothing there that suggest Rod or Robert are innocent of attempting to sell a U.S. Senate seat.

So, in a nutshell:

In the past.

The Blagojevich brothers and their attorney's repeatedly professed that proof of their innocence is captured on the government's tapes.  And that, if the public were allowed to hear the tapes, the brothers would be found innocent.

Present day.

(1) John Chase and Jeff Coen claim that the Blago's and their attorney's were lying.

(2) The Blago brothers and their attorneys are not disputing Chase and Coen's claims.

Conclusion:

The Blago's and their attorney's lied about what's on the tapes.


So, what will the Brothers and their attorney's want you to believe next? (coming soon)

Questions:

(1) What was captured on roughly 400 hours of recorded Blago wiretap conversations?

(2) Why can't we hear them?

(3) Why are the Blagojevich's and the U.S. Attorney's Office hiding behind a phony protective order?

Developing  story...... 

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20Oct/120

Weekly Standard reviews Tribune reporters’ book on Blago

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Annabel Kent, Chicago Media Critic  

Washington Examiner local opinion editor, Barbara Hollingsworth, has written a review of the recently released book about former Illinois Governor Rod “Blago” Blagojevich, entitled Golden, written by Chicago Tribune reporters John Chase and Jeff Coen.

Hollingsworth’s review appears in the Weekly Standard here.  It is entitled “The Blago File, and states that,

“[M]ore serious readers seeking answers to questions raised about former U.S. attorney Patrick Fitzgerald’s multiyear, multimillion-dollar investigation will not find them here. Major omissions in Coen and Chase’s otherwise meticulously detailed narrative regarding the Tribune’s own role in tipping off Blagojevich that he was under wiretap surveillance ultimately render their account incomplete.

Hollingsworth exposes several of the book’s “major omissions” in her 1,200-words review, and refers to

“incredulous bloggers” at Illinoispaytoplay.com who have been openly skeptical about the Tribune reporters’ account of the Blago Fitzgerald episode.

Developing…

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