9Feb/130

U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald “Most Dangerous Man”

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Ernie Souchak, Editor-in-Chief

Former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald was right when he said this about Ali Mohamed: “This is the most dangerous man I have ever met. We cannot let this man out on the street.”

However, we believe that, in hindsight, Fitzgerald proved more dangerous than Ali Mohamed.

In-fact, Patrick Fitzgerald may be remembered by history as being a danger to the American way-of-life - depending, of course, on who writes the history of this alarming era.

We hear you thinking, "Why that's nuts!"  Really?

It's not nuts when you take into account the events involving Fitzgerald leading up to 9-11, as those events have been documented by Peter Lance, and others.
                                                               Amazon/Triple Cross

It's not nuts when you examine the chain-of-events set off by Fitzgerald's willing incompetence, and wonder what this era would have been like had he'd done the right thing.

So let's play...What if?

What if Patrick Fitzgerald had had Ali Mohammed arrested - the person he described as "...the most dangerous man I have ever met. We cannot let this man out on the street.”.

Would 9-11 have happened?

Would we have gone to war in Iraq and Afghanistan?

Would we have given up so many of our liberties under the guise of being more secure?

Would our financial institutions and the USD be eroding?

What if Patrick Fitzgerald had not been appointed U.S. Attorney of the Northern Dist. of Illinois?

Would John Chase have been instructed to call Rod Blagojevich and warn him that the feds were recording him?

Would Jesse Jackson, Jr. have been arrested for trying to buy the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Barrack Obama?

Would Barrack Obama have been elected President without the help and protection of U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald?

We agree with Patrick Fitzgerald's assertion that Ali Mohammed was dangerous, and should not have remained a free man.  (Did we ever find out why Mohamed remained free?)

If he had been arrested, would we have children being groped at airports by TSA agents?  Would we have warrantless wiretaps underway, or drones flying overhead?  Would there be American citizens on the President's kill list?

We think there's a good chance all that might not have happened.  And, consequently, we nominate Patrick Fitzgerald as America's "Most Dangerous Man."

To be continued.........

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24Nov/120

Patrick Fitzgerald and the Kabuki Dance of the Valerie Plame Thing

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Hugo Floriani, Investigative Reporter

Why would James B. Comey appoint Patrick Fitzgerald as Special Counsel on a case that was already solved?

Why would he even appoint a Special Counsel at all when Richard Armitage, the man responsible for exposing the identity of CIA employee Valerie Plame to the media, had already confessed and had not even hired an attorney to represent him?

Who is James B. Comey?

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James B. Comey, Jr. (born December 14, 1960) was U.S.Deputy Attorney General in the George W. Bush's administration. As Deputy A.G., Comey was the second-highest ranking official in the Department of Justice (DOJ). He ran the day-to-day operations of the DoJ, serving in that office from December 2003-August 2005.

Comey had been U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York before becoming Deputy A.G.

In December 2003, he appointed his close friend and former colleague, U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, to be the Special Counsel leading the investigation into the Valerie Plame leak after Attorney General John Ashcroft recused himself.

In August 2005, Comey left the DOJ and became General Counsel and Senior Vice President at Lockheed Martin. From there he went on to Bridgewater Associates in June 2010.

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In 2009, Comey’s total compensation package at Lockheed Martin was 6,113,797. Apparently, no one in the media cared that Lockheed worked closely with the Cohen Group where Marc Grossman was Vice Chairman.

Grossman was a key figure in Patrick Fitzgerald's quest to find out who leaked that Valarie Plame worked for the CIA.

Before Fitzgerald’s investigation team even bought their office supplies, Comey and Fitz knew that Armitage had, innocently he claimed, leaked the knowledge about Valarie Plame to, now deceased, columnist Bob Novak.

Comey left Lockheed to work at Bridgewater Associates and then, after a short stay at Bridgewater, he became a partner with Attorney General Eric Holder's former law firm, Covington & Burling.

What do Lockheed Martin and the Cohen Group have in common? Did they have any vested interests in Iraq or Afghanistan while Fitzgerald was chasing down the phantom leaker? Did the old media ever explore that possibility? 

Has any reporter ever asked Fitzgerald or Comey why a phantom leaker was sought after the real leaker had already confessed? Did any Tribune or Sun Times reporter ever pose that question to Fitz? 

Has anyone asked former New York Times writer Judith Miller how she feels about having spent nearly three months in jail after Fitz already knew that Armitage was the leaker? Does that make her a victim of wrongful imprisonment?


What does Scooter Libby say about all this?

And, lastly, did Fitzgerald or Comey violate any laws during this Kabuki dance?

Many questions – no media interest – hence, no answers. Nothing to see here folks, move alongIt’s the Chicago Way.

Next..... Where did Dick Armitage eventually land?

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